OSHA- Occupational Safety & Health Administration

With the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, Congress created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) to ensure safe and healthful working conditions for working men and women by setting and enforcing standards and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance.

The Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 was passed to prevent workers from being killed or seriously harmed at work. The law requires that employers provide their employees with working conditions that are free of known dangers. The Act created the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which sets and enforces protective workplace safety and health standards. OSHA also provides information, training and assistance to workers and employers. Workers may file a complaint to have OSHA inspect their workplace if they believe that their employer is not following OSHA standards or there are serious hazards.

OSHA standards are rules that describe the methods that employers must use to protect their employees from hazards. These standards limit the amount of hazardous chemicals workers can be exposed to, require the use of certain safe practices and equipment, and require employers to monitor hazards and keep records of workplace injuries and illnesses. Examples of OSHA standards include requirements to: provide fall protection, prevent trenching cave ins, prevent infectious diseases, assure that workers safely entire confined spaces, prevent exposure to harmful substances like asbestos, put guards on machines, provide respirators or other safety equipment and provide training for certain dangerous jobs.

OSHA’s national training and education policies and procedures offer opportunities to further advance its mission. These courses provide training and education for employers and workers on the recognition, avoidance, and prevention of safety and health hazards in their workplaces. Through these programs, individuals receive safety training in direct relation to their industry.

The importance of utilizing a duct cleaning contractor that is OSHA trained cannot be overstated. While duct cleaning is not inherently a dangerous service to have performed, the safety of the occupants of the home or building should be everyone’s first priority. Duct cleaners use ladders, hoses, compressed air lines, and cleaning chemicals. OSHA safety trained technicians will use the utmost care to ensure the job is performed properly in the safest manner possible.

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